Pentecost Sunday

Pentecost Sunday

Readings:
 

Acts 2:1–11
Psalm 104:1, 24, 29–31, 34
1 Corinthians 12:3–7, 12–13
John 20:19–23

The giving of the Spirit to the new people of God crowns the mighty acts of the Father in salvation history.

The Jewish feast of Pentecost called all devout Jews to Jerusalem to celebrate their birth as God’s chosen people in the covenant Law given to Moses at Sinai (see Leviticus 23:15–21; Deuteronomy 16:9–11).

In today’s First Reading, the mysteries prefigured in that feast are fulfilled in the pouring out of the Spirit on Mary and the Apostles (see Acts 1:14).

The Spirit seals the new law and new covenant brought by Jesus, written not on stone tablets but on the hearts of believers, as the prophets promised (see Jeremiah 31:31–34; 2 Corinthians 3:2–8; Romans 8:2).

The Spirit is revealed as the life-giving breath of the Father, the Wisdom by which He made all things, as we sing in today’s Psalm.

In the beginning, the Spirit came as a “mighty wind” sweeping over the face of the earth (see Genesis 1:2). And in the new creation of Pentecost, the Spirit again comes as “a strong, driving wind” to renew the face of the earth.

As God fashioned the first man out of dust and filled him with His Spirit (see Genesis 2:7), in today’s Gospel we see the New Adam become a life-giving Spirit, breathing new life into the Apostles (see 1 Corinthians 15:45, 47).

Like a river of living water, for all ages He will pour out His Spirit on His body, the Church, as we hear in today’s Epistle (see also John 7:37–39).

We receive that Spirit in the sacraments, being made a “new creation” in Baptism (see 2 Corinthians 5:17; Galatians 6:15).

Drinking of the one Spirit in the Eucharist (see 1 Corinthians 10:4), we are the first fruits of a new humanity—fashioned from out of every nation under heaven, with no distinctions of wealth or language or race, a people born of the Spirit.

Dr. Scott Hahn, St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology


Read previous Weekly Faith posts.

As the Diocese of Columbus reorients itself towards evangelization, the Diocese is beginning to invest more time and resources into a diocesan-wide social media presence.  As this is now beginning to grow, the Vocations Office will no longer need to carry the message in social media as the Vocations Office.  The new Social Media Department of the Diocese will have the mission of spreading the Gospel through social media and will be the avenue by which the Vocations Office works to promote a culture of vocations.  As the Vocations Office we will still continue our information website, www.seekholiness.com.  This site will be going through an exciting transformation over the next several months as the Diocese moves to a new platform.  We will also begin running our vocations-oriented messages, event announcements, and news through the diocesan social media platform.  Because of this, Face Forward’s time will be coming to a close at the end of this month.  We thank all of those who have been a part of this important work in the life of the local Church. We look forward with excitement to the spread of the Gospel and the cultivation of a culture of vocations as we enter this new phase in the life of the Diocese of Columbus.  Please continue to follow along with us through our seekholiness.com site and through the Diocese of Columbus Social Media platform.


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In Christ,
Fr. William Hahn